Essays 2018-04-09T18:44:51+00:00
Feminist While African

Feminist While African,
editorial by Varyanne Sika

What is it that African women and men mean and aspire to when they say ‘I am a feminist’? 

the political is personal

I do not see a clear distinction between my personal and political life; the two are extremely porous. I believe the converse, the political is personal, is an even stronger testament to feminist history.

Feminist Voice Consciousness

Voice Consciousness
by Felicity Okoth

A voice consciousness that takes cognisance of the systematic qualitative disempowerment of women by poverty and tenacious cultural values like polygamy…

Feminism for Survival

Now for an African woman, a curious thing happens when you become aware of sexism and speak about it: You are seen as a diversion, un-African…

My sister's keeper

My Sister’s Keeper
by Varyanne Sika

How do we as African feminists, with our different, and differing, feminisms survive the fractures amongst ourselves? In Sister Outsider, Audre Lorde exhorts us to ‘consciously study how to be tender with each other until it becomes a habit’…

Liberation is not UnAfrican

I do not see a clear distinction between my personal and political life; the two are extremely porous. I believe the converse, the political is personal, is an even stronger testament to feminist history.

the Black African Body

The Black African Body,
editorial by Varyanne Sika

“the body matters.”

the Womb

The Womb
by Felicity Okoth

The reality facing a single young African woman should she decide to bring an unplanned pregnancy to term is often dire which is why so many such women decide to abort.

sexy African

You Sexy African!
by Tiffany Kagure Mugo

“No one asks to be born, to be black or white or any colour in between, and yet the identity a person is born into becomes the hardest to explain to the world.”

sexual harassment in Zimbabwe

“No one asks to be born, to be black or white or any colour in between, and yet the identity a person is born into becomes the hardest to explain to the world.”

In My Skin
by Dorothy Kigen

A pretty face, slim waist, thick thighs — you are not supposed to work towards attaining any of these ideals, it seems, but should be born with them.

transformation of bodies

Transformation of Bodies,
by Zahra Nesbitt-Ahmed

“No one asks to be born, to be black or white or any colour in between, and yet the identity a person is born into becomes the hardest to explain to the world.”

native tongue

Native Tongue
by Ola Osaze

In my everyday life, I speak the English the Brits brought to Nigeria, the English of the African immigrant on U.S. soil that alternates between rolling Rs and hard Ts (‘water’ versus ‘warra’),pidgin…

body and I

Body and I
by Anne Moraa

I can say this now, I can speak on the absurd sexism that a girl’s open legs are an invitation, while a boy’s are not.

I am from the future

I am from the Future
by Fungai Machirori

Perhaps it is because I do not reflect the dominant idea of a Zimbabwean woman: married, highly religious, and wearing Westernised styles of hair, dress, and so on.

mirror

Mirror
by Murewa Olubela

I stare at my breasts. The one fat that makes sense.